Feb. 9

Watch for these Unofficial Satellite Events, Expert Theaters

0127-USEExhibitors, universities, nonprofit organizations and industry supporters will offer several Unofficial Satellite Events and Expert Theaters as independently organized learning opportunities during ISC 2016.

ISC 2016 Unofficial Satellite Events
These symposia and focus groups are additional opportunities for learning. These events are not part of the official International Stroke Conference 2016 as planned by the International Stroke Conference Program Committee.

Monday, Feb. 15
8 a.m.-8 p.m.
NIMICT’s Website Beta-Testing
JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE
Focus group
Sponsored by NIH/NIMHD/NINDS
Supported by New York University College of Global Public Health

Tuesday, Feb. 16
5:30-9:30 p.m.
EMS to Intervention: New Protocols for Integrating Stroke Care
CHAYA, Downtown LA
Focus group
Sponsored by Penumbra, Inc.
Supported by Evan Allen, MD, medical director of the Neuroscience Institute, Florida Hospital, Orlando; Paul Banerjee, MD, medical director, Polk County Fire Rescue, and associate director, Osceola Regional Medical Center; Don Frei, MD, president of the Society of NeuroInterventional Society (SNIS), director of the NeuroInterventional Surgery for Radiology Imaging Associates, Swedish Medical Center, Englewood, Colorado; and Jeff Wagner, medical director of Swedish Comprehensive Stroke Center and CODOC Telemedicine Network, Blue Sky Neurology, Englewood, Colorado

5:30-11 p.m.
NIMICT’s Website Beta-Testing
JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE
Focus group
Sponsored by NIH/NIMHD/NINDS
Supported by New York University College of Global Public Health

Wednesday, Feb. 17
7-9 p.m.
AF & Stroke: When to Look and How to Treat
JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE, Diamond Ballroom, Salons 1-4
Industry-supported symposium
Sponsored by Medtronic
Supported by Medtronic

7-9 p.m.
Large Vessels and Big Impact on Stroke
JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE
Industry-supported symposium
Sponsored by National Stroke Association
Supported by Stryker

7-10 p.m.
Bringing Stroke Treatment to the Front Line
Omni Hotel
Industry-supported symposium
Sponsored by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.
Supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

Thursday, Feb. 18
7-10 p.m.
Acute Ischemic Stroke — Evolving Solutions for the Changing Landscape of Care
JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE, Diamond Ballroom, Salons 1-4
Industry-supported symposium
Sponsored by Medtronic
Supported by Medtronic

Expert Theaters
Found in the Science & Technology Hall, Booth 445, the Expert Theaters offer targeted educational programs and feature products and therapeutic treatments from industry supporters. Enjoy a complimentary lunch provided by the American Stroke Association. These events are not part of the official International Stroke Conference 2016 as planned by the International Stroke Conference Program Committee.

Wednesday, Feb. 17
12:10-12:40 p.m.
Acute Blood Pressure Management: Focus on Cleviprex
Sponsored by The Medicines Company

1-1:30 p.m.
New Case Experiences Using a New and Novel Trans-sulcal Port Approach for Surgical Evacuation of ICH: The Results and Evolution Toward the Future
Speakers: Michael R. Frankel, MD, professor of neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, and chief of neurology and director, Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center, Grady Memorial Hospital; Gustavo Pradilla, MD, assistant professor of neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, and chief of neurosurgery service, Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center, Grady Memorial Hospital
Sponsored by NICO Corporation

Thursday, Feb. 18
12:10-12:40 p.m.
Cryptogenic Stroke and the Role of AF Monitoring
Speaker: Robert L. Felberg, MD, professor of neurology and medical director, Comprehensive Stroke Program, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, New Jersey
Sponsored by Medtronic, Inc.

1-1:30 p.m.
Advancing Anticoagulation Care With the Availability of a Specific Reversal Agent
Speaker: Marc Albert, MD
Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim

Symposium to focus on fundamentals of working with animal models

0127-Symposium 2As stroke research advances, so does the importance of knowing the fundamentals of testing animal models. “The Nuts and Bolts of Pre-clinical Behavioral Testing in Animals” will focus on the basics for those new to careers in research.

The half-day pre-conference symposium will be presented the afternoon of Tuesday, Feb. 16. It will cover topics such as statistical interpretation of data, an introduction to behavioral testing in rodents, cognitive testing and a presentation on the use of touchscreens by animals in studies.

“One of the biggest issues in translational medicine is why it is so difficult to translate really effective and useful pre-clinical agents into an effective therapy. Things can look fantastic in the lab and then we bring them to a clinical trial and they don’t work, so there is a big disconnect,” said Louise D. McCullough, MD, PhD, symposium chair. “People may not use the right models. That is a big issue for me as a clinician and a basic science researcher because the way we model things in a laboratory is really not effectively modeling the disease we see in patients.

“This session is targeting how we evaluate repair, regeneration and recovery in animals,” she said. “There are good tests we should be looking at, especially in cognitive testing.”

The symposium will open with an overview focusing on the fundamentals in behavioral testing in animals, such as how to perform accurate tests by being consistent in the daily timing of tests.

The second part of the session will have presentations on statistical interpretation, an introduction to behavioral testing in rodents, how to perform testing using animal models and cognitive testing.

“We will discuss which statistics are best for your study so you are not inflating your values, then we will go into more specific behavioral tests,” said McCullough, chair of neurology at the University of Texas Health Science Center/McGovern Medical School, Houston. “We will wrap it all together with a question-and-answer session.”

One of the final presentations will be by Julie Deguil, a researcher in neuropsychology, neuroscience and clinical pharmacology at Université Lille II, Lille, France, who will discuss intracerebral hemorrhage, vascular cognitive impairment and her work with rodent models.

“She has an amazing model of a disease that is becoming more prevalent — amyloid angiopathy,” McCullough said. “These mice are in behavioral boxes where they use a touchscreen. You can get very subtle test behavioral deficits, and so this is important.”

The session will conclude with a 45-minute discussion period.

Please note that there is a separate fee to register for the ISC Pre-Conference Symposium II, “The Nuts and Bolts of Pre-clinical Behavioral Testing in Animals.” If you have already registered for ISC and would like to add it to your registration, please contact the Registration Resource Center.

 

Impact of thrombectomy on emergency care, medical management focus of symposium

Stroke Pre 2 Story 1The success of using thrombectomy to treat victims of acute ischemic stroke is driving the re-evaluation of emergency care processes and the management of patients following treatment. These issues will be discussed Tuesday, Feb. 16, during ISC Pre-Conference Symposium I, “Stroke in the Real World: To Infinity and Beyond: Endovascular Therapy and Systems of Care.”

The daylong symposium will feature didactic presentations and debates in the morning, with two sets of four breakout sessions in the afternoon. During lunch, faculty members will review the results of clinical trials studying the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The symposium will conclude with speakers from Australia, Canada, the European Union, Israel, South Korea and the United States discussing stroke management issues in their countries.

“What do you do with thrombectomy patients? How do they need to be managed medically? Also, what needs to be done to change our healthcare system so people will be able to receive this therapy?” asked Ted Wein, MD, symposium chair. “How will it change the landscape of how patients are identified and transported? We will hear ideas from around the world about how people are trying to get this done.”

Symposium presentations and debates will follow a sequence most stroke patients face, starting with pre-hospital screening, followed by issues of emergency treatment and where treatment should occur. The morning will conclude with a debate about imaging techniques, said Wein, assistant professor of neurology and neurosurgery at McGill University, Montreal.

“There have been five trials with positive results showing what an efficacious therapy thrombectomy is,” he said. “The No. 1 problem is that there are a limited number of people in each city who have the technical expertise to do this. Second, the biggest challenge is how do we get the right patients to the right hospitals.”

Two speakers will debate where emergency patients should be transported after strokes. Michael D. Hill, MD, MSc, associate professor in the departments of Clinical Neurosciences, Community Health Sciences and Medicine at the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, will state the case for going to the nearest stroke center. Edward C. Jauch, MD, MS, professor and director of the Division of Emergency Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, will argue for taking patients to a Comprehensive Stroke Center.

“This will highlight what changes need to be made in 911 services, how EMS personnel evaluate and triage patients in the field, and how ambulance drivers know which hospital should provide care,” Wein said.

A presentation by Mai N. Nguyen-Huynh, MD, assistant professor of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, will address how community hospitals evaluate patients to identify whether they should be transferred to a Comprehensive Stroke Center.

A key to evaluation is imaging technology, which will be debated. Gregory W. Albers, MD, professor of neurology and neurological services at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, will support the use of advanced penumbral imaging/collateral imaging. Andrew M. Demchuk, MD, professor of neurology in the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Calgary, will state the case for the use of CTA/MRA and ASPECTS imaging.

In the afternoon, interactive breakout sessions will look at topics such as interpreting imaging, reimbursement issues, the financial implications of using thrombectomy, including how its use affects the transfer of patients, and the medical management of patients following thrombectomy.

“What are the common complications, and what are the medical challenges related to thrombectomy?” Wein said. “We want to make sure everybody is prepared to deal with these complications. Some patients may stay at the Comprehensive Stroke Center, but other patients may be sent to their community centers because there is concern that if all patients are brought to the comprehensive centers, the centers will be overwhelmed. Post-thrombectomy management is going to be important for individuals to understand.”

Please note that there is a separate fee to register for the ISC Pre-Conference Symposium I, “Stroke in the Real World: To Infinity and Beyond: Endovascular Therapy and Systems of Care.” If you have already registered for ISC and would like to add it to your registration, please contact the Registration Resource Center.

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